Four-try Andy Short happy to emulate Chris Ashton

first_img TAGS: Worcester Warriors LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS BATH, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 11: Andy Short of England dives over for his second try during the Under 20 international match between England U20 and Italy U20 at Recreation Ground on February 11, 2011 in Bath, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Short though is quick to quell any murmurings of a Grand Slam just yet, and said: “We’re just taking it one game at a time. It’s a cliché, but the moment anybody’s focus moves beyond the next match is the moment you’ve lost it. Our preparation for the Italy game was spot on. We all put a lot of hard work in during the week and we took that into the game. We were accurate and absolutely nailed it, everything that we’ve been working on in training came off for us.”center_img England U20 take on France in their next match at Short’s home ground Sixways Stadium in Worcester.Tickets can be purchased from Worcester Warriors for as little as £10 for adults, by calling on 01905 454 183 England U20 Andy Short flying over for his second try in a similar fashion to Chris Ashton over the weekendON A weekend where England Seniors notched up eight tries, England U20 went three better, scoring 11 on the way to beating their Italian counterparts 74-3.Chris Ashton may have stolen the headlines for Martin Johnson’s men with his try-scoring exploits, but Worcester Warriors wing Andy Short matched the Northampton man, also scoring four times in the U20s emphatic win.While Ashton’s now infamous dive has caused a stir in the rugby world, Short is much more accustomed to touching down before receiving a pat on the back from his teammates, although he couldn’t resist flying over the try-line for his first. “It just opened up for me,” he said. “The pitch was quite soft so I just made a dive for it. It wasn’t quite as spectacular as Ashton’s but I’ll take the comparisons if it means scoring four tries every week!”“From a personal point of view I’m over the moon to get four. It’s the most I’ve ever scored in a match – I normally play centre but I’m getting a taste for being out on the wing now!”Short was joined by London Wasps centre Elliot Daly in heading over the white wash on four occasions in a blistering display of ruthlessness and precision by Rob Hunter’s men at Bath Rugby’s Recreation Ground.last_img read more

Giselle Mather breaking new ground – Blog

first_img“My ultimate approach to the whole thing is that I want to be viewed as a great rugby coach, not that girl who is a rugby coach,” she says.While, at present Giselle may personally not be ready for life as a coach in the Aviva Premiership, should that very opportunity come her way, there is little doubting from previous successes, of the impact she could have on the landscape of English club rugby. Giselle is the beacon for expanding and increasing the exposure of women as rugby coaches…whether she likes it or not! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Giselle Mather – in charge of the London Irish AASE Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence programmeCould she be the first female Premiership Coach in World Rugby? Asks Rugby World reader Larissa Falls. Giselle Mather talks personal achievements, team accomplishments, future goals, family commitments, role models and rugby coaching.Giselle Mather doesn’t do praise. Asked whether she takes any credit from her remarkable coaching achievements, she modestly replies, “thank you.” Arguably one of the most successful rugby coaches in Britain, you wouldn’t dispute it if Giselle was less humble and more overconfident. After all, it seems Mather’s got the Midas touch…and a record to prove it.As Head Coach of London Wasps Ladies between 2001 and 2004, Giselle took them to back-to-back Premiership titles. She’s guided the London Irish AASE Squad [Advanced Apprenticeship and Sporting Excellence] to being Plate Winners and South League Winners. As Back’s Coach of the England Women’s Senior team, Mather lead them to a Six Nations Championship and a World Cup Runners-Up medal, while coaching the England U20 Women to three seasons unbeaten and back-to-back Nations Cup Titles.Giselle has also achieved a plethora of titles with Teddington Antlers RFC, including Surrey 2 Champions, Middlesex Bowl Winners, Surrey 1 Champions, RFU National Junior Vase Winners, London 3 SW Champions, RFU National Senior Vase Winners, and a 62 game unbeaten stretch with the Antlers Senior Men’s team.With such an esteemed coaching record, you could be forgiven for thinking Giselle was born to be involved in rugby. But not so! Initially, she didn’t even want to play the game.Mather’s playing career only began after seeking an alternative to hockey, and was initiated by a suggestion from her Teddington-playing boyfriend [and now husband]. Even in the beginning, Giselle considered the idea ridiculous, but after much persuasion and pestering from the Teddington Ladies team, she took to the pitch and demonstrated a natural talent for the oval ball game.An aptitude that would see her as successful in the boots and shorts as she is with the coach’s whistle. A player for London Wasps Ladies and Teddington Ladies, Giselle was capped 34 times for England and was a winner of the England Women’s only ever Rugby World Cup Final triumph, in 1994 [which she remembers as her best sporting moment].Giselle Mather, Wasps manager celebrating the league win in 2003The progression from rugby player to rugby coach nearly didn’t eventuate either; although not of her own accord. It was during the infancy of Giselle’s career, when she was in her second year at Exeter University studying PE [she is a trained PE Teacher], that she came across the first of many gender infused challenges. The course choices were split according to gender, with boys being offered rugby, and girls dance.“I’d started playing rugby when I got to Exeter, and I’d discovered a real passion for it,” Giselle says. “I understood they wouldn’t let me actually play with the boys, but I didn’t see why I shouldn’t study with them. I knew this was what I wanted to do. So I refused the dance option, and there was a stand-off. I was only just out of school but I wouldn’t back down and eventually they gave in.”It is this steely determination, passion for rugby, and intense ambition already evident in her University days, that enables Mather to deal with the unfair, and unfortunately inevitable, viewpoints made by male players towards a female coach. Giselle explains, “Male players’ initial perceptions of a female rugby coach can be interesting, but this only lasts for the first few minutes.”As for further hurdles faced by Mather throughout her coaching career, “I guess being the first female to do my Level 4 [she is the only female in Britain to hold this coaching qualification], and always being the only female on coaching courses can throw up the odd issue.”“When I started my Level 3 Coaching training I rang the Rugby Football Union (RFU) and said, ‘I’m feeding my baby and I have to bring her with me.’ Although I was one woman among 100 men, I had no choice. The RFU had certainly never had a request like that before. They hummed and hawed and eventually said, ‘OK, as long as you are discreet,” she says.Since 2000 when Giselle began her coaching reign, she has carved a prodigious reputation in this role. From Development Groups to Senior Sides, from club squads to International teams and from Assistant to Head Coaching jobs, Mather’s achievements would surely rival almost any CV. And what of her greatest coaching accomplishment?“Each team and each individual I work with throws up different challenges and therefore different achievements come out of those challenges,” Giselle says. “The obvious ones would be my U20s side beating the USA 110-Nil in the U20s Nations Cup Final with a stunning performance, or Teddington winning two National Cup finals back-to-back at Twickenham for example.“But then seeing a particular athlete develop, grow and improve and get into the England side and win her first cap, or one of my AASE boys mature as a player and gain an academy contract [seven out of the 14 boys who left the program at the end of the 2010/2011 season secured contracts with top Premiership clubs] also rank up there as great achievements for me. Gaining my Level 4 Qualification was an 18 month process and was a challenging experience,” she says.And an achievement unheard of in the male coaching ranks; “Taking my first International squad away in 2000 with my eight month old first born in tow was also a major achievement for me.”center_img “I guess to single one out is hard as that is why I love doing what I do, as different challenges demand different approaches which result in different achievements, all of which I value highly,” Mather says.However, some of Giselle’s grandest feats could be on the horizon. When asked if she would like to coach in England’s premier club rugby competition, the Aviva Premiership-and be the first woman to do so- she cautiously replies, “Yes, when I’m ready!” But adds, “Just because it hasn’t happened before [a female coaching a Premiership club], doesn’t mean it will never happen- those sorts of barriers don’t stand in my way,”“At the moment though, I have a young family and I want to commit to them,” she says.The expected family commitments entwined in motherhood is something her male coaching counterparts are less scrutinised over. The mother of three children under the age of 11 [Jasper, Roxy and Barny], says, “You have the issue of having and raising a family which is very challenging for a coach at the professional level, as it is definitely not a Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm job at that level. I feel that affects me as a female more than my male counterparts.”Women are slowly breaking the glass ceiling across varying professions. Men work well under female bosses and women Generals succeed in the military, yet there is still a clear imbalance in professional rugby coaching; where few females coach men but many men coach females.However Giselle believes it’s down more to “evolution” than preference. “It takes time for the process to role through. The game for women really got going in the late 1980s. An individual then goes through their playing career, say 10 plus years. That takes us through to the late 1990s early 2000s. It then takes time to travel through the coaching process to gain the experience necessary to coach at the professional end of the game.“There is also the fact that boundaries have to be broken down as so few women coach at the top end of the game, but that is changing constantly as more women evolve into the coaching ranks having completed their playing careers. And as more lads are coached by females, it becomes more the norm instead of the unheard of,” she says.Since 1994- when Giselle helped England lift the Women’s World Cup-, a lot has changed in the women’s game- and for the better. The recent 2010 Women’s World Cup recorded sold out attendances each day, whilst the final played between England and eventual champions, New Zealand, amassed an impressive13,000 spectators, with Sky Sports covering the Cup live. Last December saw Dana Teagarden become the first female official appointed by the IRB to referee a men’s senior International match, while the 2010 Pat Marshall winner, Maggie ‘The Machine’ Alphonsi stated that she now gets recognised, and stopped, by people in the streets.Giselle believes it’s only natural that women coaching male teams, follows a similar path of progression. “There are now already several women coaching in the female game. I feel that if these female coaches want to it is just an evolutionary period of time before we see these females coach in the men’s game. Providing the female is good at what she does, be it player, referee, or coach, I believe there is a bright future for her in rugby,” she says.With Giselle Mather a clear pioneer and architect, leading the way for females in rugby coaching, it is clear she’s going to be the prototype from which other women may wish to follow. So how does being seen as a role model sit with the Teddington head coach?“I take that side of things quite seriously and would see it as a privilege,” she says. “When I took my coaching badges from 1 right through to 4, I was always the only female on the course, and as a result you are in the spotlight whether you like it or not. I am aware that as one of the first to do what I’m doing I have a huge responsibility to try to do the best of my ability so that my gender doesn’t become an issue or an excuse for those who doubt. I see it as important that I do well so that the next female who applies gets taken seriously.”And what for Giselle’s future goals within coaching? “Today it’s no longer about proving myself. It’s about getting on and doing the job as well as I possibly can,” she says.“I’ve got to keep challenging myself and work to become the best coach I can be. To continue to challenge and develop myself, my athletes and my teams to push themselves to be better today than they were yesterday. To continue to enjoy and be passionate about what I do. To recognise the right opportunities for me when they present themselves and then be able to grasp and make the most of those opportunities,” Mather explains.last_img read more

Lions 2013: The No 8 debate

first_imgFormFaletau has been a model of consistency throughout the season, but Heaslip hit a run of form towards the end of the domestic season with Leinster, impressing in the Amlin Challenge Cup final and dotting down to clinch the RaboDirect Pro12 title. He’s also hit the ground running in Oz. Easter says: “Now the team is out there, you might see a vast improvement in one player where form is concerned. Some guys will fade after the long season, where others, say like Paul O’Connell and Dan Lydiate, who have hardly played, will be fresh.”Silent type: Easter would Faletau at No 8CombinationsWith a mere six games before the Test series starts, and with any players who featured in domestic finals rested for the first game of the tour, there hasn’t been much time for Gatland to test out different back-row partnerships. But Easter says: “Combinations will have a lot to do with selection. So far they’ve bulldozed the opposition so easily, there’s been no inkling of what’s going to work really well in a Test match.“But Sam Warburton’s captain so he’ll be there, and he’s used to playing with Faletau. If I was picking the team, he’d be my choice.” Who would you pick to start at No 8 v Australia? Tweet us @Rugbyworldmag or tell us on Facebook Rugby World Magazine not for featured LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Head to head: Heaslip wraps up Faletau at the 2011 World Cup quarter-final. Who will earn the Lions Test jersey?By Bea Asprey, Rugby World Writer MANY MINUTES will be spent and even more pints will be sunk by rugby fans discussing the options for the Lions Test back row between now and 22 June. Competition for those three berths is fierce, and in particular, it’s hard to drive a wedge between Toby Faletau and Jamie Heaslip, who are battling it out for the coveted No 8 jersey.TemperamentBoth popular members of the squad, the two are chalk and cheese in terms of temperament. Dragon Faletau is one of the quietest, most softly-spoken Lions, whereas Leinsterman Heaslip, in contrast, is vocal and opinionated. Heaslip has more Test caps under the hood – 57 for Ireland and three for the Lions – and has experience on his side. However, Faletau, at just 22, has started all of his 26 Test matches, including every game of Wales’ 2012 Grand Slam, showing the faith Warren Gatland and Rob Howley have in him. This was after making a name for himself at the 2011 World Cup, where he was part of a side that reached the semi-final. He’s also calmness personified, and you would assuage that he would deal with the pressure cauldron of a Lions Test debut comfortably.Pick me! Heaslip in action v Western ForceBall-carrying & defenceA fundamental part of any No 8’s game, Faletau has been known to destroy opposition teams with his pace and ability to break tacklers, and he’s also a nightmare for those attacking against him. A fine judge of the duo’s relative merits is former England No 8 Nick Easter who comments: “Faletau is a destructive ball-carrier and a dynamic runner, so adds an element of skill, whereas Heaslip is a better ball player.” This may be, but Heaslip dominated the stats in his performance against Western Force, finishing the game as the Lions’ top ball-carrier with 118 metres carried, nine defenders beaten and 13 out of 13 tackles completed.LeadershipHeaslip has captained his province, Leinster, on numerous occasions, and was named Ireland captain for this year’s Six Nations, famously ousting Brian O’Driscoll from his decade-long tenure. But while he was delighted with the accolade, it seemed to affect his performances on the pitch, during a dismal campaign which ended in Irish coach Declan Kidney being relieved of his duties. Faletau is no leader in the same mould, but his team-mates surely take inspiration from his team ethic and dirty work at close-quarters.last_img read more

Wales: Regional Rugby infographic

first_img Regional Rugby has had its ups and downs since their formation in 2003/04 season, but there is no doubt they have contributed hugely to a sustained period of success at international level, with Wales winning three Grand Slams in 2005, 2008 and 2011 added four Six Nations titles in the last nine years. An added feather to the cap for the game, was having 15 Wales internationals in the Series winning Lions squad out in Australia last year.So which region has provided the most internationals to the Test game and which players have had the most caps in that time? Thomas Davy has put together a brilliant infographic detailing the Welsh caps in all their entirety. Want to subscribe to Rugby World? Click here for the latest deals and discounts, and find out how to download the digital edition here. Shoulder to shoulder: The Regions have produced over 100 players for Wales Since 2003, over 100 players have taken a bow for Wales whilst contracted to a Welsh region, so how do the numbers divvy up?center_img There are plenty of home grown stars featured in the current issue of Rugby World with Ospreys lynchpin Dan Biggar talking about his European aspirations, midfield powerhouse Scott Williams, plus we have up-and-coming Dragons centre Tyler Morgan and Dragons CEO Gareth Davies giving his thoughts on the state of the nationCredit: Ten2TwoCreative www.ten-2-two.co.uk LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

RBS 6 Nations: England 21-10 Ireland

first_img TAGS: Highlight STATISTICS42 – The two teams missed 42 tackles between them, with England slipping off 23 and Ireland 19. England made 147 tackles to 135 by the visitors.101 – The number of metres made by Robbie Henshaw with the ball in hand, more than any other player in the match. Josh van der Flier was the top tackler with 17.420 – England’s total metres made with the ball in hand, but as they made 295m in the first half, it shows how Ireland forced them onto the back foot after the break. Beaming Brown: Full-back Mike Brown scores England’s second try. (Photo: Getty Images) England kept their Grand Slam dream alive with a scrappy RBS Six Nations win over the reigning champions at Twickenham. They outscored Ireland two tries to one but there are plenty of work-ons to keep their feet firmly on the ground in the coming weeks.The first half was a tale of England knocking repeatedly on the Ireland door but never being allowed in, as the visitors repelled attack after attack. By half time England were only 6-3 up and looked like they might be made to pay for their lack of finishing power when Ireland made a fast start to the second half and took a 10-6 lead in the 46th minute thanks to a try from Conor Murray.Sting low: Conor Murray burrows his way over the line to score Ireland’s try. (Photo Inpho)However, Owen Farrell narrowed the gap with a penalty after Devin Toner was penalised for shoving him over, then two tries in a five-minute burst suddenly put England 21-10 up. First Anthony Watson collected a glorious scoring pass from Chris Robshaw and crossed the line on the left, then Mike Brown sprinted over on the right as England put the ball quickly through hands to stretch Ireland’s narrow defence.England spent some of the remaining 18 minutes hanging on by their fingernails as Jack Nowell made a try-saving tackle on Robbie Henshaw and England debutant Elliot Daly combined with George Kruis to hold up another Test first-timer Josh van der Flier over the line. Despite having Danny Care sin-binned inside the last ten minutes, England kept Ireland at bay and are now the only side who can still win a Grand Slam this year. Hard to stop: Billy Vunipola on one of his many barging runs (Photo: Getty Images)WHAT’S HOT…Billy Vunipola on the hoof – The big No 8 deservedly picked up the Man of the Match award after causing Ireland all sorts of problems in attack. One of his many breaks created the momentum which led to Brown’s try and he made a total of 96 metres from 18 carries.Ireland’s last-ditch defending – Ireland might have missed 14 tackles in the first half but they made their hits when it really mattered, with Murray and CJ Stander combining to take Vunipola into touch in the left-hand corner when the No 8 had raced round the blindside of a scrum, then Murray and debutant centre Stuart McCloskey brought down Dylan Hartley under the posts when the England captain looked set to score their first try.England’s recovery – They failed to capitalise on a lot of possession and territory in the first half and then went  behind in the first five minutes of the second half, but England did not panic and instead found a way to up the pace and stretch Ireland’s narrow defence, creating two tries which turned the game in their favour. Twice they went a man down due to sin-binnings, but England’s defence also held out in a tense last ten minutes.Ireland’s debutants – Openside van der Flier and centre McCloskey both looked at home in the Test arena, with van der Flier seemingly scoring a try only for the officials to rule that they could not see a clear grounding of the ball. Ultan Dillane made a strong impression off the bench when he came on in the second row for the last 15 minutes.No try: England’s Jack Nowell forces Robbie Henshaw to spill the ball on the line. (Photo Getty Images) England: M Brown; A Watson, J Joseph, O Farrell (E Daly 65), J Nowell; G Ford, B Youngs (D Care 59); J Marler (M Vunipola 59), D Hartley (capt, J George 70), D Cole, M Itoje, G Kruis, C Robshaw (J Clifford 70), J Haskell (J Clifford 76), B Vunipola.Tries: Anthony Watson, Mike Brown. Con: Owen Farrell. Pens: Farrell 3.Yellow cards: James Haskell (44), Danny Care (71).Ireland: R Kearney; A Trimble, R Henshaw, S McCloskey (S Zebo 63), K Earls; J Sexton (I Madigan 76), C Murray (E Reddan 70); J McGrath (C Healy 59), R Best (capt, R Strauss 70), M Ross (N White 59), D Ryan (U Dillane 65), D Toner, CJ Stander (R Ruddock 66), J van der Flier, J Heaslip.Try: Conor Murray. Con: Johnny Sexton. Pen: Sexton.Referee: Romain Poite (France)Man of the Match: Billy Vunipola (England)Attendance: 81,826center_img What’s hot and what’s not from England’s Twickenham showdown against Ireland. WHAT’S NOT…England’s conversion rate – England spent long periods of the first half camped in the Ireland 22 but could not turn the pressure into a single try. Slow ball, knock-ons and indecision all conspired to keep Ireland’s tryline in tact in that first period.Mike Brown’s footwork – The England full-back caught Murray in the face with his boot while he was trying to ruck the ball back in the shadow of his own posts. The official looked at replays of the incident and decided the contact was accidental but Brown could have taken more care of where he was putting his foot and Murray was forced off with a cut to his face. For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

WATCH: Horror tackle results in double red card for France U20

first_imgFrance, who play Wales on Friday night in Colwyn Bay, and England are both level in the standings with 15 points but the French currently sit top of the table because of their better points difference.Be sure to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The sanctions for a dangerous ‘lifting’ tackle are:Lower end – four weeks.Mid-range – six weeks.Top end – 12+ weeks.Looking at this tackle, you would suspect it falls into the top-end range.Key score: Cameron Redpath scored the only try of the game in England U20’s win over France (Inpho)As for the U20 championship, England are now firmly back in the title race after bouncing back from a defeat by Scotland to beat France 22-6.They play their final game against Ireland at Coventry’s Ricoh Arena on Friday night following the women’s fixture. Two France players were sent off for a tip tackle against England in the U20 Six Nations The tackle brings back memories of the one inflicted on Brian O’Driscoll in the first minute of the first British & Irish Lions Test of the 2005 tour to New Zealand. No disciplinary action was taken against Keven Mealamu or Tana Umaga back then, but you would expect these two French players to receive lengthy bans.The two players lift Dingwall above the horizontal and he was not returned to ground safely, appearing to land on his shoulder/neck area. Fortunately, Dingwall did not get seriously injured in the incident, but it could have been far worse. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS WATCH: Horror tackle results in double red card for France U20France U20 went into their game against England in Beziers looking to take another step towards a Six Nations Grand Slam. Eighty minutes later, not only had they suffered their first defeat of the championship but they had seen two players sent off for a horrendous tip tackle.It was late in the game that England’s Fraser Dingwall looked to be in a good position over the ball at a breakdown, a typical jackal stance. France’s Hassane Kolingar and Pierre-Henri Azagoh then lifted him by the legs, turned him upside down and dropped him on the ground.It was a horrendous tackle and the referee rightly showed both players a red card.This is the footage of the incident from social media: Double red: Hassane Kolingar and Pierre-Henri Azagoh leave the field after being sent off (Inpho) last_img read more

Who is Dan Biggar: Ten things you should know about the Wales fly-half

first_img The Wales fly-half explains how to test defences… 6. When it comes to football, Biggar is a Manchester United fan.7. Biggar married Alexandra Cummings in 2016 and the couple have a son named James.MORE ON DAN BIGGAR Dan Biggar: How to kick to regain Dan Biggar: How to kick to regain LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS There’s more to the No 10 than meets the eye Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. 5. The fly-half made his Wales debut for against Canada in 2008 at just 19 years old. His second cap also came against Canada – in Toronto in May 2009. Who is Dan Biggar: Ten things you should know about the Wales fly-halfDan Biggar is an experienced fly-half who has won more than 80 caps for Wales and is now plying his trade in the Gallagher Premiership with Northampton Saints.But just who is the Welshman? We decided to find out a little bit more.Ten things you should know about Dan Biggar1. Dan Biggar was born on 16 October 1989 in Morriston, Swansea. He is 6ft 2in (188cm) and weighs 14st 6lb (93kg).2. He won the 2015 BBC Cymru Sports Personality of the Year award, beating footballer Gareth Bale, cyclist Geraint Thomas and boxer Lee Selby in the public vote.3. He became the youngest player to make 100 appearances for the Ospreys in 2012. In all, he played 210 times for the region – and scored more than 2,000 points – during his 11-year spell before moving to Northampton Saints in 2018.4. Biggar has an interesting routine before kicking for goal, which fans labelled ‘The Biggarena’ after 1990s hit Macarena.center_img Dan Biggar is known for his kicking ability (Inpho) Expand 8. He played in his 50th Test for Wales against Argentina in November 2016 and at the end of that 2016-17 season he was named in the British & Irish Lions squad to tour New Zealand.9. The Welshman is a keen table tennis player and enjoys playing in his spare time when on international duty. He is also a tennis fan and has named Roger Federer as his sporting hero.10. He scored 23 points when Wales famously beat England in the pool stages of the 2015 World Cup. Collapse Dan Biggar on family, fly-halves and the future The No 10 has found a new groove… Dan Biggar on family, fly-halves and the futurelast_img read more

VIRGINIA: Changed along the way, St. Stephen’s comes home

first_imgVIRGINIA: Changed along the way, St. Stephen’s comes home Comments are closed. April 2, 2012 at 6:17 pm Almost 15 years ago I worshiped with the St. Stephen’s community feeling ever so loved and welcome. Thanks be to God you are home once again. Blessings during this Holy Week Members of St. Stephen’s process inside their church for the first time in five years on Palm Sunday. Photo/Emily Cherry[Episcopal News Service] More than a few tears were shed and smiles shared by the members of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Heathsville, Virginia, this Palm Sunday, following the resolution of a five-year legal dispute with another congregation over ownership of the property.One of those members, Meade Kilduff, was baptized in the 131-year-old building in 1918. At the time, Kilduff’s mother traveled over two days by train and by boat in the dead of winter from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to her hometown of Heathsville for Meade’s baptism. Years later, Kilduff would return to raise a family – and to worship in St. Stephen’s.That’s why this past weekend was a homecoming for Kilduff and other members of the congregation, as they returned to their historic church after worshiping in temporary spaces for the past five years. “I am so overwhelmed,” said Kilduff. “I didn’t realize how much I loved it until I came back. It is so beautiful.”The return follows the Fairfax County Circuit Court’s ruling that seven congregations in which the majority of members and clergy left the Episcopal Church in 2006 and 2007 to join the Convocation of Anglicans in North America must return all property to the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia by April 30, 2012. St. Stephen’s is the first of four “continuing congregations” of Episcopalians to transition back to their parish home.“When people go through painful experiences, especially painful experiences that have to do with the church, especially painful experiences that have to do with church conflict, it is easy for us to understand why people give up on faith, or at least give up on the church,” said the Rev. Lucia Lloyd, rector, in her Palm Sunday sermon. “But the folks who, for one reason or another, stick with faith or come back to it, and the folks who, for one reason or another, stick with church or come back to it, usually do find that we, walking in the way of the cross, find it none other than the way of life and peace. The whole journey has been wonderful.”Parishioner Dawn Mahaffey agrees. “Looking back on this, it has been a blessing,” said Mahaffey. “We’ve come together. We’ve come to really understand what a church family is.”That sense of family characterizes the members of St. Stephen’s. “The lay leadership that has emerged from dealing with adversity has been amazing,” said Lloyd. “These laypeople take initiative, come up with creative solutions to problems, and aren’t afraid of hard work to put them into effect.”One of those “creative solutions” was finding a temporary worship space — first in a neighboring Methodist church, and later in what has come to be known as Chilton Chapel, a privately owned home that the St. Stephen’s parishioners transformed into a worship space. They tore up 50-year-old, wall-to-wall carpeting and then refinished the floors. They scraped seven layers of wallpaper off the walls. They painted, cleaned, designed and furnished. “We got dirty and grubby doing it,” said St. Stephen’s parishioner Sandra Kirkpatrick. “Almost every single one of us had an interest in that space.”Sunday marked the start of a new chapter in the life of St. Stephen’s. Next weekend, parishioners will celebrate Easter Sunday in their historic church, and on April 14 they will invite members of the community and the diocese to join them in a special homecoming.And they’ll continue their ministries and work as a community of faith. “We talk about our ‘spiritual journey’ and, for this congregation, that journey has been a physical reality,” said Lloyd. “This journey for us has been like walking a labyrinth. You wind around, not knowing where the twists and turns are going to take you next, or how long it will take, but you keep walking because you trust. And then you get back to the place you began, but along the way, as you walked and prayed through the uncertainty, you have been changed when you arrive back home.”— Emily Cherry is the communications officer for the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia. Joan Gundersen says: Harry Denman says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN April 22, 2012 at 11:30 pm According to the ACNA/C ANA congregation’s web site they are now meeting at a local Baptist Church. They had enough warning that this was coming to arrange a site. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET April 3, 2012 at 8:34 am I am glad when reconciliation begins to take place, but let’s not pretend that this type of thing is over. While Bishop Duncan “from his base” may have been influential, that really doesn’t matter. That assumes that people are mere “sheeple”; mindless and unable to discern matters for themselves. People in Virginia and elsewhere discerned and acted. None were forced to listen to a few loud preachers or bishops. The arguments were convincing. There are some very real problems in TEC that have been unaddressed; namely the current cultural captivity that we find ourselves in. In the name of “progress” we have even gone so far as to allow the culture to dictate what marriage is and is not, rather than God’s Word. If we place more stock in the truth as we see it rather than the truth as revealed in Scripture then we will continue to decline at an alarming rate. We have lost 40%+ of us in a generation and there is no sign of slowing. The diocese has lost thousands of members; most of whom were praised for their vitality only a few years ago. To rejoice that there are nearly abandoned properties being barely filled is not heartening. Josh Thomas says: David Charonis says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC April 2, 2012 at 5:58 pm To have been born and reared in southern ways before relocating north, I can only apologize again and again for the serious pain and hurt that a VERY misguided Bob Duncan inflicted upon many in the United States from his base in Pittsburgh. Please know that our Diocese in Pittsburgh will next elect a truly Episcopal bishop… and, begin to recover, also. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs April 3, 2012 at 2:12 pm You wrote:There are some very real problems in TEC that have been unaddressed; namely the current cultural captivity that we find ourselves in. In the name of “progress” we have even gone so far as to allow the culture to dictate what marriage is and is not, rather than God’s Word. If we place more stock in the truth as we see it rather than the truth as revealed in Scripture.REPLY: To begin at the end and work back, honesty requires one to admit, I think, that “the truth as revealed in Scripture” IS ALWAYS “the truth as we see it.” Scripture speaks to us and we respond (sometimes by not responding); unfortunately, Scripture does not reply to us and say, “Erm, that’s not the right response.” Which is not to say that the totality of Scripture, or other things in Scripture, often do provide the corrective. Actual living people either accept what they’re taught about the meaning of Scripture and tradition, or arrive at that or some other conclusion, some other way. There is no such thing as Scripture uninterpreted.As for “marriage,” the term is in fact nowhere defined in Scripture. If it were, you’d have a real problem with that in modern times, as polygamy is assumed throughout. The Torah, and later the writers of the Epistles, provide regulations to govern marriage (consanguinity rules, what ends a marriage other than death, what is the status of the divorced and the widowed, and so on). Nowhere is it written that marriage is always and only between one man and one woman. Cultural assumptions as to when a marriage occurs are taken as givens, to which instruction applies. Society (specifically the societies originally addressed by the Biblical writers) provides the initial definition from which point Scripture elaborates, comments, and instructs.This is not to say that Society is always right, or that culture dictates our beliefs. Really, that is insulting to the many thousands of Christians who have developed a different understanding which they believe to honor Scripture, tradition, and reason. It is irrelevant how the issue came to their attention initially. That is the fallacy of post hoc propter hoc; that is, that cultural change proceeds and therefore also causes the change that follows.Finally, the focus on this one issue (gay people and their relationships), affecting a very small percentage of people compared to the whole population of society or the Church, distorts and challenges your own conclusions. Jesus said very little about marriage or sex, and nothing at all about homosexuality. In the rest of the New Testament, it is a question of interpretation whether the writers addressed any concept of homosexual orientation or same-sex relationships, other than those of (often temple) prostitutes or rapists.But the question remains: do you distort the nature of the Church and the Scripture by giving the degree of emphasis on this one subset of doctrine that you do? By assuming that God does not speak sometimes through the reform movements of the larger culture, is there no danger of sinful pride? How can you be sure that TEC is in fact on the wrong course? Numbers? Really? Jesus told Peter to feed his sheep, not count them. Change in a direction you see as culturally determined? We’re back to interpretation, yours or ours.Which is worse, heresy or schism? The great Councils of the Church risked schism for the sake of orthodoxy only over the gravest matters, such as the nature of Jesus and the Trinity. The Church Fathers typically viewed schism as the greater evil. Heresy can be rejected and recovered from–or later emerge as the “correct teaching” in later times. It need not destroy the unity of the church, except in matters of the utmost importance, the kinds of issues addressed by the Councils of the undivided Church. Schism, on the other hand, destroys the peace and unity of the Body of Christ in precisely the way prohibited by the teachings of the Epistles: the ear is as much a part of the Body as the eye; every part has its function in the whole; let love and kindness prevail in all things. The Church has a duty to “police” its own ranks in matters of doctrine and morals, but without degenerating into factionalism. Even the excommunicate can still be saved. But schism institutionalizes whatever division there is, and it’s almost impossible to restore unity once that happens. Consider how long it took American Protestant denominations to recover from the breach caused by our Civil War.I do not dismiss your sincerity in all the things you think were justified, but I reject your methods. In the end, it is for me a matter of law and order, and that has been the basis of the church’s resorting to litigation over property. We did not kick anyone out of TEC because they disagreed with the majority in our polity. We don’t sue to get properties back in TEC hands because of your beliefs, but because of fiduciary responsibility. Clergy aren’t deposed because of their beliefs, but because of their violations of church law on other matters. Usually: I live in the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth, so I know that local ordinaries can and do abuse their power sometimes, on both sides.Clearly, TEC frames the questions and pursues its answers in a way that some dislike. But it is incumbent on them to either remain in full communion despite their differences, or to remove themselves to another Christian fellowship that better suits them. But their decision to go does not exempt them from the rules that the larger denomination has in place regarding its property and its governance. The litigation is unfortunate, but has generally sustained TEC’s rights in matters of property and “discipline.”In conclusion, I urge you to think of those you disagree with, as we try to think of you: that you are sincere and reasonable, just not right as to our human judgment. I give you and all I disagree with that benefit of the doubt, and further the benefit of the doubt that you do not neglect to care for the poor and suffering, and otherwise honor the name of Christ in your lives. Can you not return that presumption of good faith and goodwill? An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET April 3, 2012 at 2:04 pm Rejoice, Rejoice, Rejoice! Replant, rebuild, renew! As a member of a 400 plus and growing- strong congregation that openly welcomes ALL (what, you think Episcopal church signs lie?) and as a proverbial “southern belle, cradle” I am thrilled for the parishioners of St. Stephen’s and for the direction our church is taking. The Episcopal Church has always been a bellwhether of progress. Once we realize that this wonderful church is not our parents’ or grandparents’ church, nor should it be….It is heartening to see others of steadfast faith willing to risk all for openess and change. We can spend our energy arguing cultural biases or we can move forward in faith and remain cutting edge Christians. I see St. Stephen’s has chosen the latter! In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 3, 2012 at 3:36 pm For my friend Virginia:I’ll bet that we could sit across from each other with good Virginia-style tea and talk about this one! I’m glad for your happiness in your church, but now I’m confused, so please help. One very major reason that the litigation by the diocese against the dissenting churches was pursued was that the diocese represented that they had a duty to past members who had dutifully established the churches and properties. Your view is that …”The Episcopal Church has always been a bellwhether of progress. Once we relaize that this wonderful church is not our parents’ or grandparents’ church, nor should it be….” Which is it? At what point do we move away from established faith and practice for the alternative priority of being above all else, a “bellwhether of progress”? This is what those thousands (and more) worshipers couldn’t get around. At what point does the Church leave behind the received faith and practice for something that it has never been anywhere on the globe and not called heresy there. Should we redefine marriage just because the culture wants it? Should we, in the view of a bishop, gladly embrace all sexualities because we haven’t discovered them all yet? At what point is this no longer Christ-centered, Christ-only progress, and instead just deteriorating into the culture that Jesus came to change and redeem? Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem April 3, 2012 at 10:33 pm Doug Draper: The Episcopal Church is the counter-cultural body here, not the schismatics. The latter group upholds the standard culture that criminalized and persecuted Gay people, while telling us over and over again “this is how it’s always been” and “scripture says so.” You don’t get to have it both ways. Down doesn’t turn to up just because you switched the directional sign.Here we are, surrounded by this gun-toting, immigrant-bashing, money-worshiping culture, but Episcopalians say, “This is not the path of salvation.” It would be a surprise if our numbers were growing with that kind of message, but persist we shall, even when the Holy Spirit leads us to unpopularity. Jesus didn’t win the Gallup Poll on Good Friday either. David Shaw says: Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing April 3, 2012 at 3:34 pm I have been praying for you all in Pittsburgh for years now. You all have been an inspiration to the rest of us in the Episcopal Church. Thanks and God bless! Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Doug Desper says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bryan Taylor says: Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Doug Desper says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID April 13, 2012 at 9:24 am Any takers for the question that I keep posing? How far should people have to happily accept the private revelations and teachings of today’s TEC leadership?How can a theologically revisionist leadership in TEC pursue changes to, say marriage, define it for what it has never been anywhere at any time in the Church, change the canons, change the catechism, not be content until a new Service is designed, and then claim that all of the those who oppose it are not loyal and should just keep accepting such changes? That has been the general course in TEC for a generation. The more that such revisionisim takes place the more intolerant the leadership has become for anyone who opposes it. Remember the tolerance that was designed for those who opposed women’s ordination? How loyal Episcopalians were told that it was an option that they should allow, but would never be forced to accept? Come forward a few years and now there is no room to oppose it. Fast forward a few years and today’s loyal Episcopalians who do not accept ordination and marriage of homosexuals are being likewise marginalized. Why is it that when segments of the Church do not agree with these private inspirations of TEC’s leadership that they get marginalized and told that THEY are the ones who are breaking the union of the Church – and that they can go – and leave the fruits of their work behind? For who? Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET April 14, 2012 at 2:46 pm Apart from the controversies already addressed by other respondents, I would have appreciated some mention in this article about where the ANCA congregation moved to. Although they’re not going to embrace me as a member (I’m in a S/S marriage), I still want them to be able to gather to worship, and would like to know that they can. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Doug Desper says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Joan Gundersen says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Doug Desper says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA April 5, 2012 at 12:52 pm For Josh:Our heritage includes Articles of Religion that note historically that churches in certain times and places “hath erred”. It also includes the needed Reformation, but a outlier hanging along in those same years in the person of Henry VIII who tossed Scripture, clerics, and Councils aside until he got the results that he wanted. As a Church without a one-person/final word on all matters, we are burdened with being a Reformation Church: one that takes the Bible as the start and ultimate guide, and interpreted in an accountable community. Richard Hooker rejected the “private revelations” of the Pope apart from the Scripture as well as certain utterings of enthusiasts of his time who declared that “we have found something, but alas it’s not Biblical”. The Episcopal Church has a decision to make: are we a Reformation Church that takes the Bible seriously and also rejects private revelations that the rest of the Church doesn’t agree with, or are we a Church that casts about until we find the reason for the results that we want? No one answers at what point we stop being serious Bible students living in community with a global Church and instead devolve into a Henry who pushes all aside for the results that are desired.The culture of privatized individualism over living in community should be rejected or else we become Pelagian; a Church of individuals with their own revelations.In order to approve same-sex marriage, we will knock over the Scriptures, ignore the witness of a global Church, change the canons, change the Catechism, and change the marriage Service.So: how can you explain to the world and our pews that THEY are the ones who have changed and are no longer loyal Episcopalians? Should people just keep going along with these private inspirations and revelations and then be told that if they don’t, just leave all their stuff and leave? martha knight says: Comments (15) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Very Rev. Bruce D. McMillan says: Rector Belleville, IL April 2, 2012 at 4:22 pm What wonderful news. God is good to those who continue in the faith of the risen Christ. This may still be Lent, but this action deserves a geat “ALLELUIA!” Rector Tampa, FL By Emily CherryPosted Apr 2, 2012 Virginia Harper says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release April 3, 2012 at 7:54 pm I remember very fondly the last great bishop of Pittsburgh, Robert B Appleyard. May the new bishop be filled with the grace and compassion he was. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab April 11, 2012 at 11:22 pm Folks, Let’s not use a simple joyous return to rightful owners of property kept by a group that tried to ignore the plain reading of property canons of the Church and diocese which they swore to uphold in order to be ordained or serve in church office and who ignored the previous interpretations of secular statutes on church property, despite warnings about how this would turn out. Don’t use this occasion to rehash other debates. The fact is that when members of a hierarchical church leave FOR WHATEVER REASON, (liberal, conservative, theological, secular, etc.) they are free to go, but not take the property. The St. Stephen’s Episcopalians have been in exile from a worship space that was built by Episcopalians for Episcopal worship. The testing that came during that exile strengthened them. Now they are back in their beloved sacred space. Hallelujah! I wish the ACNA/CANA group that has finally relinquished the space no harm. They are now free to build their own traditions on their own, and to develop their own sacred space. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Chris Butler says: last_img read more

RIP: The Very Rev. Robert G. Oliver

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Episcopal News Service] The Very Rev. Robert G. (Bob) Oliver, a former dean of the American Cathedral in Paris, died April 26 in Atlanta, Georgia. He was 83.Oliver was ordained to the priesthood in the Diocese of Florida in 1960. He was rector of two mission congregations in Georgia and North Florida. He then served as a canon of St. John’s Cathedral in Jacksonville, Florida; rector of Holy Innocents’ in Sandy Springs, Georgia; and dean of St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Jackson, Mississippi.He became dean of the American Cathedral in Paris in 1974.In 1979 he was called to St. James’ Episcopal Church in Los Angeles, where he served as rector until 1990 when he retired and moved back to Georgia.He earned a degree in Labor Economics from the University of Florida, and then became a line officer in the U.S. Navy. He served aboard an aircraft carrier and later at the Navy Pre-Flight School in Pensacola, Florida.He was a member of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem; the Southern Academy of Letters, Arts and Sciences; the Newcomen Society; the English Speaking Union; and Beta Theta Pi (a social fraternity). He was a companion of the Order of the Cross of Nails at Coventry Cathedral (he was associated there during a 1965 sabbatical in England).During his tenure at St. James the parish built an apartment complex for seniors, St. James’ Manor, in 1985.Oliver is survived by two nephews.A graveside service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 4, at Oaklawn Cemetery in Jacksonville, Florida.A service celebrating Oliver life is planned for a future date to be held at Canterbury Court Community in Atlanta, Georgia. Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis People Obituary, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted May 2, 2013 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC RIP: The Very Rev. Robert G. Oliver U.S. Navy officer was dean of the American Cathedral in Paris Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

Companions of St. Luke, OSB elects a new superior

first_img People An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Brother Basil Edwards, OSB was elected by the professed membership of the Benedictine Community, The Companions of St. Luke – OSB to be their Abbot for the next five years.The constitution of the Companions of St. Luke requires that the superior serves a single five year term.  Abbot Basil who follows Abbot Robert Cotton, OSB assumed his role immediately upon election on May 27, 2015.Abbot Basil, OSB entered the community in 2008 and was solemnly professed in 2014.  He is a member of St. Paul’s parish in Seattle, where he serves on the Evening Prayer teams, sings in the choir, and is participating in discernment committee for a candidate for the priesthood. He has served the parish in several different liturgical roles, including serving at the altar for both Sunday and Weekday Holy Eucharist, Lecturing and leading Solemn Evensong and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament.  He holds both PhD and MD degrees and has recently accepted a position on the Medical Ethics committee of the Diocese of Olympia.  Abbot Basil is Professor Emeritus of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine at University of Washington School of Medicine and is still practicing part time at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.The Companions of St. Luke (CSL) is a dispersed Benedictine Community with members in 22 states, the District of Columbia, England, Canada and Brazil. CSL began in the Diocese of Chicago in June 1992 and is a recognized Christian Community of the Episcopal Church. The community is an active member of the National Association of Episcopal Christian Communities. Our website is here and our application program Opus Dei is here. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Posted Jun 16, 2015 Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Companions of St. Luke, OSB elects a new superior Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more