Sri Lanka Tamils march to protest deaths, disappearances

first_imgCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Hundreds of ethnic Tamils have begun a four-day protest march from eastern to northern Sri Lanka to demand justice for civilians killed and forcibly disappeared during the country’s civil war, allegedly at the hands of the government’s military. Politicians, civil and religious leaders on foot and in cars joined the march, which is also protesting alleged plans by the government to change the demography of the traditional Tamil heartland by settling majority Sinhalese there and taking over private lands. Sri Lanka marks its 73th anniversary of independence from British colonial rule on Thursday. The approximately 500-kilometer (300-mile) march from the east to the north, which Tamils consider their homelands, is to end Saturday.last_img read more

Spitalfields faces legal threat from SMUT

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Beijing passes law to protect medical whistleblowers

first_imgSince the initial outbreak in January, Chinese authorities have waged a crackdown on COVID-19 rumor-mongering, investigating and detaining hundreds across the country. Beijing’s city government will protect “non-malicious” medical whistleblowers under a new law, passed months after a Chinese doctor was punished for sounding the alarm at the very beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.China’s leaders suffered a rare wave of public outrage after ophthalmologist Li Wenliang died of the disease in Wuhan, the city where the coronavirus first emerged late last year.He had attempted to warn authorities about the new infection but was instead reprimanded for “spreading rumors”. Topics :center_img Other medical whistleblowers in Wuhan later told Chinese media they were punished by government officials for discussing the outbreak without permission from superiors. The new Beijing law, which came into effect from Friday, states that anyone whose tip-offs are later verified would be rewarded, and suffer no penalties. But the regulations do not cover anyone “fabricating or deliberately disseminating false information” about developing public health emergencies, according to a government notice on Saturday.The new legislation is similar to a public health emergency law passed by Shenzhen municipal government in August, which also vows to protect “non-malicious” whistleblowers from legal consequences — the first of its kind in China. last_img read more